“The Night With” Ensemble Offspring and Duo van Vliet in Glasgow

While indie and jazz music makes a rite of passage and a home in dark and dank of basement venues, art music tends not to hang about that aesthetic, especially to host world premieres of new commissions. Throughout Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen, and Belfast, “The Night With” series 2019, led by artistic director and composer Matthew Whiteside, invites leading ensembles and audiences to get comfortable in venues stripped of context and conflation, to celebrate living composers and living music. The Glasgow iteration of the series on 10 September hosted two leading ensembles, Ensemble Offspring and Duo van Vliet, who ventured down to the underground space of Hug and Pint, a vegan pub and leading music venue within the indie scene. Downstairs, the basement walls crowd inward, black with patches of exposed brick dressed with gig posters, and a centred disco ball. Tiny stools spread about the open floor, and the stage amess with the logistical complexity of electroacoustic sound. With a gender-balanced ensemble and programme, Sydney-based Ensemble Offspring shared, with an intimate audience, truly genuine immersion and advocacy for Australia’s vibrant and living new music culture. In ...

The Nightingale Trailer: Aisling Franciosi and Sam Claflin Star in Jennifer Kent’s Follow-Up to The Babadook

The Nightingale Trailer: Aisling Franciosi and Sam Claflin Star in Jennifer Kent’s Follow-Up to The Babadook In a Rolling Stone cover story this week, Janelle Monáe responded to longstanding speculation about her sexuality and came out as pansexual—or, in her words, “a free-ass motherfucker.” Her transparency has been well received, particularly in a climate of backlash and hostility toward queer people of color. But if the article had come out a day later, it may also have been redundant, as Dirty Computer, Monáe’s third album, is her most unapologetically carnal and overtly queer to date. Unlike 2010’s The ArchAndroid and 2013’s The Electric Lady, Dirty Computer isn’t part of Monáe’s Metropolis saga, a series of loose conceptual suites starring her tuxedoed android alter ego Cindi Mayweather. Instead, she’s singing—and often rapping—as herself, with lyrics drawn directly from contemporary intersectional feminist discourse. “We gon’ start a motherfuckin’ pussy riot or we gon’ have to put ’em on a pussy diet,” Monáe crows on “Django Jane.” She bemoans “men tellin’ me cover up my areolas while they blockin’ equal pay” on the glittering synth-pop cut “Screwed,” and taunts Donald ...